Tagged: sonic chaos

A Review of Sonic Chaos (Game Gear)

1993

————————-Spoiler Warning————————————

The Story

Sonic runs along ground covered in grass under a dark blue sky. He passes tall trees, purple flowers and distant mountains as he runs at a high speed along the ground. Dr Robotnik, seated in a small, grey machine, appears flying in the sky ahead of Sonic. Holding a red Chaos Emerald in the machine, Dr Robotnik flies in a strange pattern front of Sonic, taunting his enemy by flying just ahead of him and grinning. Suddenly, Dr Robotnik’s machine accelerates quickly and speeds off. Sonic chases after the villain, followed by Tails, running at a slower pace.

Sonic or Tails finds Dr Robotnik in the Electric Egg Zone. Dr Robotnik attacks the hero using a machine which explodes after they fights back. Dr Robotnik, vulnerable without any technology, is forced to run at high speeds to evade the hero, before leaping onto a platform which flies him upwards to safety. Soon after the villains escape, the red Chaos Emerald falls to the ground. Sonic or Tails picks up the item and escapes.

Such subtle complexity and development of character.

The Review

Unfortunately, I have no experience of playing the Game Gear and this review is based on the version of the game available as an extra feature in the Sonic Adventure DX game.

The story is very similar to the story used in many early Sonic games, explore a number of levels to reach Dr Robotnik’s base and defeat the villain. This game does use a few animated sequences to develop the story. This game also features the red Chaos Emerald as a desired item held by Dr Robotnik, however, the importance of this stone is not expanded and seems to be a device used to create a story.

This game allows the player to play as either Sonic or Tails. Sonic is fast and the player is able to complete the game more as Sonic, while Tails can fly and the game seems easier when playing him. I thought this was quite innovative, as it allows the player to choose their character and have two different experiences of the same levels.

As I have discussed in other reviews, I found many of the Sonic games available on the Game Gear presented with aspects which were bizarre and had an unnecessarily high difficulty.

While the game used some interesting designs for the levels, I found the names of the zones in this game to be quite unusual. The game begins in the “Turquoise Hill Zone”, which greatly resembles the “Emerald Hill Zone” from the Sonic 2 game available on the Mega Drive (with the large palm trees, ground patterned with squares and distant mountains rising out of the sea). The name “Turquoise Hill Zone” does not seem strange, except it seems to use a bluer colour than names for similar levels in other Sonic games. The second level is called “Gigapolis Zone”, which makes it sound like it was intended to resemble the “Metropolis Zone” from the Sonic 2 game available on the Mega Drive.  The level design consists of a city at night, with clouds reflected in glass skyscrapers, glowing stars and what seems to be moonlight reflecting on a ocean, even though the foreground consists of brightly coloured squares, futuristic tunnels and construction equipment. The third level is named “Sleeping Egg Zone”, which suggests it is the location of a dormant Death Egg. Instead, the level consists of purple and green patterned squares with grass on top and a background consisting of a fairly cloudless sky, with an image of Dr Robotnik carved into certain walls. The fourth level is called “Mecha Green Hill Zone”, I am not sure if this level is supposed to represent the first level transformed into a machine environment (with a mistake in the title) or if it just a strange mix of natural and mechanised. The level itself uses steel trees and small robotic plants, with a light orange background and distant pins-like structures disappearing into the horizon.The fifth level is named “Aqua Planet Zone”. Strangely, this level does not seem to have any water, instead the level consists of ruins and tubes, with a dark blue background with purple crystals (which look like oil rigs) and a strange cloud formation at the top of the screen which looks like the surface of a sea. The game ends with the “Electric Egg Zone”, which suggests the developers were not allowed to call the final level “Death Egg” and were forced to create a vaguely mechanical name for the level. The design is similar to similar levels in other Sonic games, with a dark background and light foreground with a science-fiction machine theme. I found the level designs in this game interesting, although the levels use less innovative ideas and changes in gameplay.

The graphics of the game are quite pixelated. I found the pixelated designs added an interesting artistry to the game, although some designs looked like lower quality versions of visuals found on versions of the game available on more powerful devices.

The bosses for this game are also slightly strange as they resemble mini-bosses more than usual bosses. Unlike other Sonic games, which feature Dr Robotnik attacking Sonic with a variety of machines, most of the bosses in this game resemble large machines (some of which look like insects) with Dr Robotnik using a machine the final boss. Weirdly, both the final boss and the boss from the “Aqua Planet Zone” both use an unusual feature. After hitting the bosses a number of times, the bosses will retreat and transform, using a new attack, but, for some reason, they become weaker and only one blow is needed to destroy the machines. I found some of the bosses in this game easier because they had a limited attack ability and were much larger targets then the bosses in other Sonic games.

The power-ups used in this game are also different to other Sonic games. There are no shield power-ups, which makes Sonic more vulnerable. The invincibility power-up is very similar to other games, with Sonic surrounded by stars. The ring and extra life power-ups are also similar to other games. The sneakers power-up has been changed though. Instead of causing Sonic to temporarily run at higher speeds, this power-up turns his shoes into rockets, allowing him to travel in the air. Jumping onto certain springboards causes these springboards to become attached to Sonic’s feet, allowing him to reach higher areas before he jumps off the device.

Other bizarre additions to the game include the Sonic dash. This involves Sonic running on the spot while the player holds certain buttons, releasing the button causes Sonic to surge forward, temporarily invincible. I found this move slightly pointless as it is less effective than the spin dash and seems to be a something the developers added because pressing the same combination of buttons as Tails causes that character to fly through the air. Like in other games in the series, each act of a level ends with a signpost that Sonic runs through to finish the act. In this game, however, the signpost will always land on the picture of Flicky (the blue bird common in Sonic games), the letters “Km/h” and constantly changing numbers will then appear. The changing numbers will stop to show (I presume) the speed Sonic hit the sign. I am not sure how hitting the sign at different speeds benefits the player. This game also removes the capsules usually found after defeating the boss in Sonic games. The end credits also has a small cast and thanks people like “Hitmen”, “The Hase”, “J.S” and “And You”.

I found the game was mostly difficult when collecting the Chaos Emeralds. To reach the Special Stages, the player has to collect 100 rings in the level, causing a bright light to engulf the screen and Sonic being transported to the Special Stage. Although the levels contain large amounts of rings, the fact Sonic getting harmed once severely affects the player’s ability to reach the Special Stage makes the game more difficult (especially considering the game does not provide a shield power-up). The Special Stages themselves are also difficult. Instead of using a similar idea in all stages, the Special Stages in this game are all different and require different skills to progress through and reach the emerald. The stages are also timed (even though power-ups are supplied which increase the time the player can spend). The end of the Special Stage (whether the player succeeded or failed) also ends the level, meaning the player can only attempt a Special Stage once in each act. The player cannot enter the Special Stage if they play the game as Tails (possibly because it is easier to collect rings playing as that character). The designs for the Special Stages use a dark clue background and vivid colours in the foreground, giving the areas a dreamlike feel. I found the Special Stages in this game interesting, as they tested the players problem solving ability, and difficult, because of the timing. The Special Stages were less innovative than other games in the series, as they used the same method of gameplay as the levels.

I also noticed a strange aspect of the game associated with the loss of rings, which also made the game more difficult. The amount of rings possessed by Sonic is an indicator of how vulnerable he is, as the character can only die if he does not have any rings. When Sonic is harmed, his rings, in most Sonic games, spread out and the player has to gather them to ensure they can survive future harm. In this game, if Sonic has between 10 and 20 rings, only two rings will appear. One ring will bounce to the side at a fast pace (making it difficult to retrieve) will the other bounce up and down at the point Sonic was injured. This means the player will only be able to get 1 ring after being harmed. If Sonic has less than 10 rings when he is hurt, a single ring will rise to the top of the screen and disappear. This effect makes the game more difficult, as it is difficult to keep a high ring count after being harmed, and hinders the players ability to reach the Special Stage.

In conclusions, I though the game was good. The gameplay was enjoyable and allowed the player to play as two different characters. The levels were interesting and used good designs. The game was fairly easy, with obtaining the chaos emeralds providing much more difficulty. The Special Stages could be irritatingly hard and some of the methods used to hinder the players ability to reach the Special Stage were annoying.

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