Tagged: sonic triple trouble

A Review of Sonic the Hedgehog Triple Trouble (Game Gear)

1994

———————–Spoiler Alert—————————

The Story

Blackness. Six gems fall from the sky, glittering in the darkness as they fall to the ground, six different colours brightly flashing among the blackness. A pink ball bounces from the side, picking up each diamond-shaped gem. After taking the last Chaos Emerald, the ball uncurls and Knuckles stands, laughing following his triumph. He quickly leaps into the air and assumes a gliding position as Sonic appears, running after the flying Knuckles. The darkness fades as a background of a tree-lined shore slowly appears. Sonic pursues Knuckles, followed by Tails flying in the air. Dr Robotnik appears, using a rocket powered vehicle to hover above the ground, smiling as he extends his arm to reveal his possession of a golden Chaos Emerald. He quickly accelerates upwards.

Sonic travels through some levels, before reaching Knuckles, who uses a machine to attack Sonic. Sonic defeats Knuckles and reaches the Atomic Destroyer. Inside the Atomic Destroyer, Sonic fights Mechanix and finds Nack. After Nack wakes up and taunts Sonic, the ground shakes, causing Nack to run away (suddenly losing his desire to annoy Sonic)and Dr Robotnik to appear. Dr Robotnik then uses two machines to attack Sonic. After his machines are destroyed, Dr Robotnik flees,  closely pursued by Sonic, until he attempts to escape using a floating platform. While Dr Robotnik stands laughing, Sonic hits him, causing him to lose the golden chaos emerald and the platform to explode, leading to the device and Dr Robotnik to fall down a pit. Sonic runs along a platform and finds Knuckles, locked in a flashing cage (how and why are not explained). Sonic destroys the prison and the two shake hands, before escaping the Atomic Destroyer.

The game ends with Sonic sitting on the top wing Tails’ biplane as Tails flies the plane towards a distant island while the sun sets over a restless sea.

Are there plots that are more difficult to follow?

The Review

This game is a review of the version of the game available in the Sonic Adventure DX game, rather than the one released on the Game Gear.

The story for the game, while quite simple, is actually more developed than other Sonic games released at the time. There are a few animated sequences to show the story and demonstrate the personalities of the characters, outside of exploring a number of different levels with no link to each other. The number of characters has also increased.

This game takes place during an interesting time in the Sonic series due to the introduction of Knuckles the Echidna. In previous Sonic games, the characters had very simple personalities. Dr Robotnik was a villain interested in mechanising the world, Sonic was the laid-back hero and Tails was Sonic’s sidekick, a slower hero who seemed to worship the main character. These characteristics did not really affect the story of the game.

Knuckles, however, made the games more complex. During the early games to feature Knuckles, he was initially portrayed as a villain, interested in collecting the Chaos Emeralds, obstructing Sonic and working with Dr Robotnik. At some point during the games, he would be betrayed by the villain and would be shown to be a misguided hero who had been tricked by Dr Robotnik into believing Sonic wished to misuse the power of the Chaos Emeralds. Games featuring Knuckles would start to incorporate more storytelling devices to explain this characteristic and would develop the story of the game. In this game, he appears at the end of each level, laughs and activates a switch which causes a cascade of either snow or fire to fall down, followed by the beginning of the next level. In later games, Knuckles seem to become a more straightforward hero, who focussed on using strength rather than speed.

Interestingly, this game features the Nack character. I have not encountered this character in a game before and the only time I have seen this character was in the Sonic Comics. In the comics, Sonic is transported to a strange dimension where he encounters Team Chaotix. The team (consisting of Vector the Crocodile, Charmy the Bee, Espio the Chameleon, Mighty the Armadillo and Nack the Wolf) become regular characters and have their own game (some people might consider the two events to be a cynical marketing ploy). In the stories, Nack becomes a traitor and aligns with Dr Robotnik. In this game, Nack is basically a villain, although his exact role in the story is a little mysterious. He mostly appears in the special stages and prevents Sonic retrieving the Chaos Emeralds. This makes him seem like a guardian of the Chaos Emeralds, but he appears later in the Atomic Destroyer level, suggesting he is a henchman of Dr Robotnik. His function is never explained in the story, giving him a strange place in the story.

I have noticed that many of the Sonic games released on the Game Gear seem to use a mixture of strange ideas and unnecessarily difficult gameplay. This game is not as difficult as previous games in the series though.

The level designs are interesting, but the names of each level are very strange. Firstly, the levels in this game are not called zones, which is different to most other Sonic games. Unlike other Sonic games released at the same time, the first level is not named as a hill (such as Emerald Hill Zone and Green Hill Zone). The game begins in the Great Turquoise, which resembles an idyllic countryside, with clear skies, a lake in the background and waterfalls, except with the bizarre addition of trees topped with springboards. The second level is called Sunset Park, however, the level does not resemble a leafy park. The level looks like an industrial area with carts, tracks and trains, with a background coloured a bright orange to mimic a sunset (which I like, but suspect others describe as sickly). This level is followed by Meta Junglira (I have no idea what this name means). The level itself has a jungle theme (with dark greens and use of sinking mud), with the surface covered in springboards and baskets (which propel Sonic upwards at a fast speed) and circular objects, which behave like obstacles in a pinball machine, suspended in the air. The next level is called Robotnik Winter, which is a wintry level with no Robotnik. The level itself consists of structures, made of dark blue tiles, covered in snow and large pillars, with blue fire at the top. The background consists of a dark pink sky and a frozen sea, with icebergs visible. The foreground also uses falling snow and Sonic can fall through piles of snow to reach lower levels. I found the use of colours actually has a soothing effect. The following level is called Tidal Plant and is the game’s water-filled level. Strangely, unlike how I imagined tidal plants to look, this level is filled unusual shapes and items that are coloured using bright, garish colours, which become subdued greens and blues when Sonic is underwater. Like many water-filled levels in Sonic games, this level features the player travelling up and down as the game allows the player to reach the surface, before exploring underwater areas which rely on the use of bubbles to provide Sonic with oxygen. The final level is called Atomic Destroyer, which sounds like the developers were not allowed to use the name Death Egg and had to invent their own base for Dr Robotnik. The level uses a mechanical design and has a black ground (with flashing lights) and dark blue foreground, which seems quite calming. The level itself uses switches to release enemies and fire lasers, along with tubes to transport Sonic through the level.

Weirdly, each level begins with the name of the level in capital letters with an animation of Sonic running to the right. The first letter of each part of the level title has a colour unique to that level.

The game also has an interesting use of Special Stages. To enter the Special Stage, the player has to collect fifty rings and smash a monitor showing an image of a Chaos Emerald. This causes a ring of stars to hover over the remains of the machine, which, if entered, transport Sonic to the Special Stage. The Special Stages alternate between two forms. One form of the Special Stage takes place in a strange location with a futuristic-classical design (with metal columns and a background consisting of purple walls and a strange melting metal effect) and requires the player to reach a point in the location within a set amount of time. The second form of the Special Stage consists of Sonic flying through the sky in a biplane, with the player collecting a set number of rings. Both types of Special Stage end with Sonic fighting a machine piloted by Nack. Defeating Nack leads to the machine exploding and Nack running away, with a fall to prove his cowardice. The player would then find the Chaos Emerald placed on a weird altar.

The bosses in the game consist of large robots, with the final two levels using Knuckles and Dr Robotnik inside large machines. Each boss uses an unique gameplay to defeat it. The first boss requires the use of springboards to attack it, the second takes place on a high speed train with the player needing to build up speed, the third can only be hit on a dynamic part of the machine with the player needing to avoid falling debris afterwards and the player needs to negotiate steep slopes, while avoiding enemies, just before reaching the forth boss. The fifth boss consists of chasing Knuckles, piloting an underwater craft, while replenishing Sonic’s oxygen. The final level uses a series of bosses: a robotic Sonic, Dr Robotnik  inside a bouncing machine and Dr Robotnik quickly passing through tubes at either side of a platform, with electric bolts falling onto the platform to harm Sonic (which seems to be a staple of Sonic games during this time). Weirdly, the mini-bosses at end of the Special Stages resemble more traditional bosses from Sonic games (the player dodging a specific attack while hitting the enemy).

Much of the game uses similar gameplay to other Sonic games released at the time. Most of the game consists of Sonic running along landscapes and attacking robotic enemies. The player can also play as Tails, with that Tails can fly, while Sonic has the weird Dash manoeuvre. There are, however, parts of the game which rely on the player using different actions to progress. Some of the Special Stages feature Sonic flying through the air in a plane and the player needs to control Sonic in a range of directions. Each level also seems to use an individual characteristic which uses an unique gameplay, for example, the third act of the Sunset Park stage consists of Sonic running along the top of a speeding train (with the player having to battle wind resistance). Some of the power-ups in the game also introduces changes to the gameplay. The springboards attached to Sonic’s feet and rocket sneakers are used in the game, along with a new power-up that produces a snowboard to allow the player to slide across the Robotnik Winter level at a high speed. The game also uses a strange skimming action. If Sonic rolls towards the surface of a body of water at high speed, he will skim across it.

This game seems to be less difficult than other games released on the Game Gear. Most of the times Sonic is harmed, the player will only lose a maximum of 30 rings (for example, if the player has collected 100 rings before colliding with an enemy, they will still have 70 rings). If Sonic comes into contact with spikes,  he will lose 50 rings (I am not sure why there is this weird differing scale of damage). The spread of the lost rings following damage is less irritating than other games. While the game keeps the strange scale of the lost rings (so if Sonic has 10 rings, 1 ring will appear, etc.), the rings are easier to collect as they do not spread out widely or at a fast pace. The player can also collect rings before a boss to allow themselves to survive more than one hit.

The graphics are fairly good. The graphics in the game use vivid colours and are attractive looking. Some of the larger pictures are quite pixelated, which seems to have an artistic quality.

In conclusion, I, personally, found this to be one of the most enjoyable Sonic games available on the Game Gear. I enjoyed the level designs and the way the game changed the  gameplay to challenge the player and make the game less monotonous. The Special Stages were easier to access and were more interesting to play (due to the different gameplays). The bosses were also unique and interesting. I also enjoyed the little animated sequences to create a small story.

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